Cruising the Highlands in Style: The Caledonian Canal

Cruising the Highlands in Style: The Caledonian Canal

There’s no beauty in the world quite like that of the Scottish Highlands. The rugged landscape will take your breath away and make you eager to see more. One of the best ways to explore the wild side of Scotland is by water, and the Caledonian Canal is the finest route of all.
At 60 miles long, this waterway features 29 lochs, 10 bridges, 4 aqueducts and more incredible scenes of nature than you can count. The route connects the south-east of the country to the north-west, reaching from the charming town of Fort William all the way to Inverness. There’s plenty to do and see when you cruise Scotland: the awe-inspiring castles and famous whisky distilleries are sure to catch your attention.

 

You can sail in the shadow of royalty here. In 1873, Queen Victoria travelled on the canal, which has been extremely popular ever since. The canal’s stunning route makes it easy to see why Queen Victoria loved to cruise Scotland so much!

Thanks to James Watt, the inventor of the Watt steam engine, the idea of constructing the Caledonian Canal first surfaced in 1773. It aimed to connect the eastern and western sides of Scotland, providing work for locals and reducing the need to make a dangerous journey around the coast. The canal would enable all key lochs of the Great Glen could be connected, including Loch Ness, Loch Lochy and Loch Oich.

30 years later, the project was approved by the Scottish government and was led by Thomas Telford, a Scottish engineer. It was designed to run in an incredibly straight line along a geographical fault, and was supposedly a master class in engineering. However, the project missed its deadline by 12 years, taking 19 years to build in total, and also exceeded its budget.

This caused problems for ships that were previously designed to navigate the canal: by the time that it was finished, the ships’ designs were outdated and unsuitable. Although steamer ships with iron hulls were capable of sailing around the Scottish coast, these were too big for the waterway. As a result, while the project was visually impressive, it wasn’t quite the huge success that designers had hoped for.

Despite this, cruising along the Caledonian Canal is an amazing experience from start to finish. Among its many highlights is Neptune’s Staircase: as the longest stair lock in the UK, it takes an impressive 90 minutes for a barge to travel the distance of 500 yards, passing through 8 different locks and rising 70 feet in the process.

If rugged natural beauty, astounding industrial skill and authentic local history sounds like your idea of the perfect cruise, Scotland is the destination for you.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of all-inclusive, luxury canal holidays across Europe. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge holiday, whether you’re looking to cruise Scotland, France or Italy.

The Military Might of Burgundy: Château de Bazoches

The Military Might of Burgundy: Château de Bazoches

One of the best but frequently overlooked ways to see Europe’s sights is by water. There’s nothing like cruising in a hotel barge and immersing yourself in the local scenery and culture, especially when there’s so much to see all around you. Join us aboard L’Art de Vivre on a journey through Burgundy, and soak up some of the finest attractions that France has to offer.
For lovers of France and military history alike, L’Art de Vivre will take you exactly where you’d like to go. The Château de Bazoches is a treasure trove of historical interest, military prowess and elegant architecture.

 

Back in Time

Dating back to the twelfth century, the grand château was originally built on a Roman site, overlooking the Morvan landscape. The estate itself originates from the fashionable antiquity of the seventeenth century, as evidenced by its magnificent architecture. Walking through its halls, you can easily imagine the courtiers of King Louis XIV strolling past you.

A True Genius

The most famous owner of the château is Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, widely renowned for his military genius. He purchased the estate following his enormous success in the siege of Maastricht, for which Louis XIV rewarded him with a large sum of money. His home became the headquarters for his strategic and fortification designs, which were widely respected and used by many French cities for over a century.

Ahead of his time, Vauban understood modern advances in technology and weaponry, making him a master of military planning. He would use intricate miniature ravelins, bastions and moats to further his ideas, and became a pioneer of the bayonet rifle, the iron-barrelled cannon and the mortar. His prowess in military engineering and strategy was unparalleled, so it’s no surprise that over 300 cities in France feature his designs, including Lille, Dunkirk and Bayonne.

Luxury Libraries

Château de Bazoches is also home to an extensive library, which contains over 5,000 books and is a must-see for literature enthusiasts. Vauban himself had a passion for literature, and penned his famous Royal Tithe during his time there. Unfortunately, his written criticism of the upper classes and the inequalities of the taxation system cost him his royal favour, causing him to fall from grace for the rest of his life.

Further Information

If the rich and varied history of this grand Burgundian house sounds too good to be true, what are you waiting for? European Waterways will take you on a luxury hotel barge cruise and ensure that you take in all of France’s best sights. For more information, don’t hesitate to explore our website or get in touch with our friendly team of experts.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of all-inclusive, luxury hotel barge holidays in France. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.

Lose Yourself in Delft’s World Famous Pottery and Painting

Lose Yourself in Delft’s World Famous Pottery and Painting

One thing is for certain: there is nothing in the world quite like Dutch art and craftsmanship. It’s no wonder, then, that Delft, a 750-year-old town, is so famous for its painting and pottery, which is why it makes the perfect final stop on the tour aboard Panache when you’re barging in Holland.
When you lay your eyes on Delft’s historic streets and picturesque canals, you’ll understand why so many great painters and crafters were inspired to recreate them in their masterpieces. The town gave its name to the Delft School, which saw artists such as Pieter de Hoogh, Carel Fabritius and Nicolaes Maes pass through its doors. But perhaps the town’s most famous son was Johannes Vermeer, whose paintings can be found all over the world.

 

Johannes Vermeer

Vermeer’s paintings offer an extraordinary glimpse into what life was like for the people of Delft in the seventeenth century. While Vermeer’s greatest creation is widely considered to be the Girl with a Pearl Earring, it is also awe-inspiring to see the scenery that inspired his portrayals of everyday life firsthand.

Potter About Delft’s History

The Netherlands’ history is rich with arts and culture, and Delft’s is no different. The local pottery industry reaches back more than three centuries to the country’s prosperous trade relationship with China. The activities of the Dutch East India Trading Company brought valuable Chinese porcelain back to Dutch shores, which sparked a love affair with the craft.

However, trading fell off with the death of the Wanli Emperor in 1620. Dutch potters began to experiment with techniques that would imitate the highly desirable porcelain. They developed thin earthenware that they first covered with a white glaze, followed by a clear one. The beautiful blue surfaces that were produced looked similar to Chinese porcelain, and the brilliant colour came to be known as ‘Delft blue’.

A huge disaster in the town resulted in the decline of the brewing industry, but strengthened that of local pottery. In 1654, The Thunderclap, a gunpowder explosion that destroyed large parts of the town and killed and wounded many people, meant that potters were able to take advantage of the breweries that had been left empty to expand their factories and output.

Over the next 100 years, the Delft pottery grew and grew to the legacy it still holds today. On your visit, be sure to stop by the Royal Delft Pottery, which is the town’s last remaining earthenware factory. Here potters lovingly handcraft everything you see. Why not take home the perfect memento of your time barging in Holland?

Final Stop

For all of these reasons and many more, Delft is the ideal final destination on board Panache. There is arguably no better way to experience the local heritage and culture than by barging in Holland.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of luxury all-inclusive barge holidays. If you’re looking for a unique holiday experience, European Waterways can take you barging in Holland, France, Italy and other wonderful destinations in Europe. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.

The Finest Vineyards in France: The Wine of Saint-Émilion

The Finest Vineyards in France: The Wine of Saint-Émilion

Part of experiencing of the culture and heritage of any place to is to taste it. In Bordeaux, this means sampling the area’s many rich wines from one of the oldest and largest growing regions. For connoisseurs, Bordeaux is a paradise for enjoying wine tours.
Saint-Émilion is a must-see region for any traveller in search of the finest wine, which is bound to exceed your highest expectations. On board Rosa, you’ll experience a wide range of luxurious flavours, whether it’s a rich and full-bodied red, or a light and aromatic white.

 

UNESCO World Heritage Site

In 1999, Saint-Émilion was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and it’s easy to see why. The history of grape-growing in the region is like no other, as the taste proves. Saint-Émilion, the oldest and largest appellation in Bordeaux, dictates over 5,500 hectares of land to growing grapes.

On board Rosa, you’ll cruise along the Dordogne River, soaking up the sights, smells and tastes of Bordeaux. Learn all about the varieties of wines produced here, from Médoc to the left to the vast selection found on the right bank of the river.

Types of Grape

Two of the most widely grown grapes in Saint-Émilion are the Merlot and the Cabernet Franc. Differing in taste and structure, these varieties have something for every connoisseur’s palate.

Merlot is composed of a rich, full-bodied combination of flavours with hints of plum, blackberries, dark cherries and chocolate, while Cabernet Franc is lighter and floral. The latter has become increasingly popular in recent years, due to its ability to thrive in spite of changes in climate.

Saint-Émilion Soil

Wines vary greatly in this region, which is due in large part to the differences in soil from vineyard to vineyard. For the most part, Grand Cru wines that are produced in this area are grown in soils that are rich in limestone, which can be found in the hills that surround Saint-Émilion. This greatly benefits the grapes, as the soil has vital minerals, such as calcium, that are needed to help vines grow. What’s more, its consistency provides excellent drainage.

Alternatively, the soil around Canon-La-Graffeliére boasts a sandy texture, which produces widely enjoyed and lighter-bodied tipples. When you join one of the many wine tours on offer, you can discover even more about the growing conditions and flavours of the region.

Itinerary Imperatives

When travelling through France, wine tours must be on any itinerary. You’ll be able to wow friends and family back home with your extensive knowledge at dinner parties and events. While on board Rosa, you’ll experience the process of wine-making from the very first grapes harvested to the first sip of a freshly uncorked bottle. You won’t find a more authentic or delicious taste of France anywhere.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of all-inclusive, luxury barge holidays. Offering holidays to France and other great destinations, itineraries include wine tours and other cultural and themed activities. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.

Ceramics and Châteaus: Discover Genteel Gien

Ceramics and Châteaus: Discover Genteel Gien

There’s little doubt that an essential element of all barge holidays in France is being able to dock at the myriad towns and villages that line the waterways and entice visitors in with their charms. As part of the itinerary of the hotel barge Renaissance, guests will be able to see the sights of Gien, renowned for its pottery and royal château.
Finding your Bearings

 

Prior to diving into the town, it is well worth disembarking on the south bank to take in the attractions of Gien all at once: from this vantage point, you can savour the spectacle of the river as it passes below the eighteenth-century bridge, under the watchful gaze of the sixteenth-century château.

Not even the loss of much of Gien’s historic buildings during World War II can detract from the pleasant view. Indeed, the painstaking and very convincing post-war reconstruction has done much to bury these ghosts of the past.

Marvel at Gien’s Pottery

Cultural exploration is an integral part of our barge holidays. In France, there are always abundant opportunities for the discerning traveller to discover regional produce, and Gien is no exception. The town has crafted a fine reputation for the calibre of its pottery, in particular for its Faïence pottery. Production began when Thomas Hall, an Englishman from Stoke-on-Trent who was intent on bringing high-quality English earthenware to France, established a factory in 1821.

In deciding to base his enterprise in Gien, Hall chose wisely, capitalising on the town’s physical amenities. The Sologne forest, which is in close proximity to Gien, provided a ready source of wood for the kilns. What’s more, the Loire granted access to markets throughout France (until water travel was superseded by the railways), in addition to providing sand and water for making clay.

While production continues to this day, the factory has also taken on a new guise as a museum dedicated to telling the story of the industry and shedding light on the making of these exquisite ceramics.

A Château Fit for Kings and Queens

There’s one more attraction that certainly merits a visit before you return to the hotel barge. Holidays in France are rarely complete without sojourning for a while at a château, and Gien’s has certainly welcomed its fair share of royal visitors. This elegant edifice was constructed for the use of Anne de Beaujeu, the daughter of Louis XI, in the final years of the fifteenth century. Future guests included Henri II and his wife Catherine de Médici, as well as Louis XIV, the famous ‘Sun King’.

Despite being bombed during World War II, the château was successfully restored. Since 1952, it’s housed a museum, which is dedicated to the most royal of pastimes: hunting. Through paintings, sculptures and an array of weapons and trophies from successful forays, the museum details how hunting and its depiction has developed through the centuries.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of all-inclusive, luxury barge holidays in France. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.

Feel the Thrill of a French Ryder Cup

Feel the Thrill of a French Ryder Cup

A Ryder Cup on the Continent is a rare thing. The last time the United States and Europe tussled on European soil was in 1997 at Valderrama Golf Club in Spain. That edition was a nail-biter, with the home team narrowly coming through by a margin of 14½ to 13½. Next year, however, the event will return to Europe once again: the Albatros Course of Le Golf National in Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines will serve as the venue from 28 to 30 September.
To make the most of the upcoming Ryder Cup, 2018 will see European Waterways offering golf fans and Francophiles alike a wonderful opportunity: a chartered golf cruise through France and the chance to be at Le Golf National to watch the world’s best competing for the game’s most coveted trophy. Here’s hoping that the 42nd Ryder Cup will be just as exciting and dramatic the one in 1997!

 

Enhance your Game on the Renaissance

Whether you choose to embark before the tournament begins to get you in the mood or decide to join a charter after the final putt is made, the hotel barge Renaissance will make sure you have many opportunities to hone your own game. As Renaissance wends its way along the Loire, it will stop at a number of quintessentially Gallic courses, such as at Château Cely and Fontainebleau.

The Ryder Cup is always a special event, but we think that next year’s is going to be a particularly exceptional one. 2018 is going to be the year when our dedicated European golf cruise truly comes into its own.

Home Soil – A Home Win?

To get your appetite whetted in advance, here’s a preview of the Ryder Cup 2018. Having comfortably beaten the European contingent with 17 points to 11 at the Hazeltine National Golf Club in Minnesota in 2016, the Americans, led by Jim Furyk, will be hoping to retain the Cup for the first time since 1993. Under the captaincy of Danish golfer Thomas Bjørn, Europe will hope that playing on home soil and the backing of the crowd will spur them on to wrest back the Cup.

As for the venue, the 18-hole L’Albatros is certainly a course befitting of such an illustrious competition. British golfer Lee Westwood encapsulated the thoughts of many of his fellow players when stating that it is his “favourite course in Europe” and that it “would make a great Ryder Cup venue”. Finished in 1990, it has acquired something of a reputation for its final 4 holes. The various water challenges to be found here are sure to test the mettle of players from both sides throughout the Ryder Cup – 2018 could see a real classic. There’ll be no such challenges for spectators, though, as L’Albatros is widely considered to provide one of the best viewing experiences in the world.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of all-inclusive, luxury barge holidays, which can be booked to coincide with unmissable sporting events such as the Ryder Cup 2018 or the tennis French Open. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.

Ready for the Road: The World’s Most Epic Motorcycling Routes

Ready for the Road: The World’s Most Epic Motorcycling Routes

Is there anything quite like seeing the world glide by from behind your motorcycle helmet visor? Nothing but you, your buddies and the open road. The unbelievable rush of roaring along Route 66 at a tidy 75 mph beats a lazy beach holiday any day of the week.
For the ultimate rush of a roadtrip with just your bike, backpack and the road, give one of these epic adventure routes a go.

 

Route 66, USA

The mother of all road trips, this 3,939km route starts in Chicago and cuts through the country all the way to LA. Depending on how much time you have and what interests you the most, you could either drive a section of it or go the whole hog (on your hog!) and see the whole thing. It winds through Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri, and doing the whole shebang would take 3 to 4 weeks according to seasoned bikers who’ve lived the legend.

With our USA travel insurance, you’ll be covered for as much of the journey as you take. Spend some more time getting to know (and win big in!) Vegas, experiencing Death Valley and admiring the Grand Canyon.

The South Island, New Zealand

This stretch of land is just breath-taking. Expect to see awe-inspiring landscapes, forests, fjords, mountains and beaches along the way. The other-worldliness of the backdrop to much of the Lord of the Rings movies will be amazing to drive along to. Other bonuses of this route include the lightness of the traffic, the smooth tarmac road surfaces, and the incredible scenery really must be mentioned again.

Stop and enjoy the Franz Josef Glacier, revisit civilisation in the city of Nelson, relax on the shores of Lake Mapourika and visit the Aspiring National Park. These are just a few attractions on the 2,100km stretch of road.

The Transalpine Route, France, Switzerland, Austria and Italy

If staying closer to home with the added bonus of bringing you bike without a huge amount of effort, this is the route for you. Starting in Grenoble in France and winding 2,400km all the way through the Alps to end in Venice, Italy, you’ve got a couple of options when it comes to traversing the Alps with more easy routes right up to a couple of more challenging ones. Expect spectacular mountain landscapes, steep gradients and a hell of a lot of tunnels, bridges and viaducts. Don’t forget to bring a load of loose change for the tolls, and don’t miss out on the climb to the Stelvio pass!

Ruta 40, Argentina

At 5,301km this is one of the world’s longest roads. It starts in Cabo Virgenes in Santa Cruz and snakes its way up to Quiaca in Jujuy, with gorgeous views the whole way along the route which runs beside the Andes. This route cuts through or drives by a whopping 20 National Parks! With incredible scenery on offer as well as the chance to ride from the South to the North of this huge country, this route is rightly popular.

Whether you opt for New Zealand, the Alps, Argentina or the USA, travel insurance by Let’s Go Insure gives you the cover you need to make the most of your roadtrip without stress.

Drive carefully and to drive safely, keep to the speed limit. Always have the necessary documentation and safety gear at hand.

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Whether you’re a seasoned diver or just starting out, there’s an undeniable romanticism and sense of adventure around wreck dives that you won’t be able to get elsewhere. The excitement builds while you’re in a speedboat zipping through the immense expanse of blue, wind whipping your hair and you into a frenzy. Often you’ll not spot any signs of civilisation as far as the eye can see and then, suddenly, with all your gear securely in place, it’s overboard and underwater into a magical world where ghostly ship remains loom as if from nowhere, waiting to be explored…
If this sounds tempting, the reality is much better. Do these thrilling historical sites offering spectacular dives, stunning reefs and enchanting folklore call to you? Great: here are three of the best this fine planet has to offer.

 

Townsville, Australia

The Great Barrier Reef is the a fabulous dive site any diver worth their salt has explored, and this British-built luxury passenger ship which fell victim to a cyclone back in 1911 is arguably its crowning jewel. Teeming with marine life and a spectacular ship in itself, if you’re only ever going to take the plunge with one wreck dive ever then this should be a strong contender.

Grand Anse, Grenada

The Bianca C has become known as the Titanic of the Caribbean after it sank in 1961 due to a boiler room explosion and consequent fire which lasted several days. At 180 metres (600 feet) long, this is the largest shipwreck you can dive in the Caribbean. If you have your full wreck dive insurance certifications then you’re in for even more fun as you’ll have multiple chances to enter the wreck.

Chuuk Lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia

Are you on the hunt for a travel destination which boasts a true wealth of wreck diving options? Then look no further than Micronesia. This little section of paradise in Oceania is undoubtedly the place for you. In years gone by it was thought to be the most formidable of Japanese strongholds in the whole of the Pacific during WWII, and Chuuk Lagoon was completely devastated after an American attack on the base back in 1944. 249 aircraft, 32 merchant ships and 12 warships sank, with over 20 wrecks having been discovered since. You’ll be like a kid in a sweetshop deciding which dives to do — some of the most popular include the 500 foot (153 metre) Shikoku Maru and the 440 foot (134 metre) Fujikawa Maru.

Mayday Mayday!

Not every travel insurance covers you for wreck diving, and some dive insurance won’t cover you below 18 metres. Let’s Go Insure’s dive insurance provides cover for up to 50 metres as long as you have the necessary qualifications. Get in touch with our team today to make sure your once in a lifetime dive insurance needs are met.

The Gnarliest Waves at Nazareé, Portugal: Not For the Faint-Hearted

The Gnarliest Waves at Nazareé, Portugal: Not For the Faint-Hearted

The little Portuguese fishing village of Nazaré is a surfing hotspot during the summer months, but in winter only the real thrill-seekers stick around. One of these is undoubtedly Garrett McNamara, the big wave big boy from the US, who in 2011 broke the record for the biggest wave ever surfed — and he smashed it right here in Nazaré.
Big Names, Bigger Waves

 

This monster wave measured 78 feet and in 2013 McNamara returned to Nazaré where he surpassed his own record, riding an absolute whopper estimated to be 100 feet tall. Later that year, Carlos Burle of Brazil conquered a wave that seemed even bigger, winning international recognition with surfers worldwide.

In 2014 Andrew Cotton from Plymouth followed suit, and is now known as one of the 4 surfers who have ridden the hugest waves around these parts. He started surfing when he was seven, so if you want to check out these waves you’re going to need a lot of practice or some pretty decent surf travel insurance…

Why Such Big Waves?!

Nazaré is such a Mecca for surfers because of its enormous waves, and these waves exist for our adrenaline-fuelled enjoyment thanks to the make up of its ocean floor topography. Just like Hawaii’s Banzai Pipeline, the Tahitian Teahupoo and northern California’s Mavericks (amazing surfing spots any surfer worth their salt know!), Nazaré’s ocean floor boasts a huge underwater gorge.

The Nazaré Canyon stretches 125 miles, starting barely half a mile from the shore and reaching way out into the abyssal plain of the Atlantic Ocean. At 16,000 feet, its unbelievable depth, coupled with its perfect positioning, helps to magnify the waves that approach the Praia do Norte beach in Nazaré. It’s because of this that almost every single day you can bear witness to monster waves up to 4 times the size of those found elsewhere along the coast.

Daredevils and Pros Alike: Surf Travel Insurance is as Essential as Board Wax!

It’s undisputed that tackling these waves is not for the faint of heart. Monster waves often move much faster than others, which forces boarders to get distance from the dangerous, frothy white water as fast as they can.

This kind of surfing is less about aesthetics than its tamer cousin: think extreme sport rather than showy carving, quick cutbacks and pretty floaters. This is about braving the aggro (bad weather), tough conditions and brutal waves while trying to remain upright and avoid reef injuries, wipeout, or even death…

While we wouldn’t recommend big wave surfing to those who aren’t pros, now is a good time to start planning your summer surf trip to enjoy the sun and sea at your (adventurous) leisure! Before you race off to enjoy the surf, travel insurance is a must-buy. Embrace the waves without the fear of monstrous medical bills should anything go wrong. You never know, with a little practice you could even be the next big name to be borne of Nazarés big waves! Surf’s up!

Take a Leap Into the Unknown: 4 Exciting Bungee Jump Techniques!

Take a Leap Into the Unknown: 4 Exciting Bungee Jump Techniques!

For many, a bungee jump is a once-in-a-lifetime, adrenaline-filled activity that you’ll remember forever – and you’ll forever be able to tell people about your jump! There are many ways to skin a cat, and some of these bungee jump techniques will make your jump even more memorable. Whether you’re a seasoned jumper or will only take the plunge once in your life, there is a thrilling technique out there for you.
Feel Like You Can Fly Techniques!

 

The Swallow Dive is one of the most popular jump styles in use today, and for good reason! Especially beloved by adrenaline seekers, you have to take a big running jump off the platform with your arms stretched out as wide as possible (like a swallow). This will let you soar through the sky to the ground below. There will be a huge adrenaline rush as you feel like you’re flying through the air… and as an added bonus, as the cord begins stretching you will be pointing downwards – perfect for a smooth and easy deceleration.

Be aware: if the body harness you’re kitted out with has a front cord attachment, ensure you twist 180 degrees so by the time the cord tightens out you’re facing upwards. Don’t worry, your instructor will know all this! But the more you know before your jump, the more relaxed you’ll be before the big event.

The Bat Drop is a little trickier than the swallow dive, and much more daring! For this jump style you’ll have to be positioned hanging upside down (!!!) on the edge of the platform. Someone else will need to be holding your feet, and once they release you you’ll shoot off like a bat or vampire into the darkness of the night!

The Back Dive is another jump which is considered to be a little more difficult. You’ll really need to put your all into launching off the platform so that when you’re at the end of your fall, your head will be pointing straight down. Just like the swallow dive, be sure to be facing upwards at the end of your jump if you happen to be using a front-connected body harness.

The Elevator is a technique you’ll definitely have seen somewhere before. You simply step off the platform with your feet pointing down at the ground, and when you reach the end of the bungee you’ll be automatically flipped the right way round.

Top tip: only do the Elevator if you have access to a rubber (Kiwi/ Euro) cord to avoid hurting yourself and doing your ankles some serious harm!

Jump Safely, Jump Insured

Whether you’re going for the jump of a lifetime or plan to tick off all of our suggested bungee jump techniques, make sure your travel insurance covers you. Let’s Go Insure offers cover for one or multiple jumps, and our friendly staff are on hand to help you with getting covered for all of your daredevil antics!